IRANCY – APPELLATION PROFILE

Posted by admin | December 27, 2019 | Blog

Irancy, in the Grand Auxerrois district of the department of Yonne, stands on the right bank of the Yonne some fifteen kilometers south of Auxerre and south-west of Chablis. It is typical of the wine-growing villages of the district, though one of the few to specialize in red wine only.. It was raised to the status of a village appellation, which it shares with the neighboring villages of Cravant and Vincelottes, in 1999.

On the label, the appellation Irancy may be followed by the name of a specific vineyard, known as a climat. (named plot) from which the wine comes may appear immediately beneath the word IRANCY in letters no larger than half the size.

The following climats are village wines from a single vineyard known as a lieu-dit:

  • Palotte
  • Les Mazelots
  • Côte du Moutier
  • Veaupessiot
  • Les Cailles


Wines
Irancy is a red wine made from Pinot Noir grapes. But winemakers may choose to include in its composition up to 10% of César, a traditional grape of this district. Rich in tannins, lively in color,  César gives the wine more color and tannic structure than Pinot Noir alone. Cesar alone is dark crimson, whereas pure-Pinot Irancy tends to be a more delicate ruby. It is uncanny how this wine has aromas of the same cherry variety that is grown in the hills in and among the vines. Sometimes floral or peppery, Irancy at its best is marked by well-defined structure and good acid balance  For all their finesse, these can be wines slow to open, as tannins melt into a velvety roundness.

Terroirs
The hill-slopes form a bowl surrounding the beginnings of a plateau below where the river Yonne cuts through. The slopes are for the most part composed of Kimmeridgian marls with an mixture of brown limestone soils.  Here Pinot Noir flourishes at altitudes of 130-150 metres. Exposures vary, mostly southerly or south-westerly. Some climats  have long been recognized as being of particularly interesting.

Color
Reds only – Pinot Noir and César
The César grape, of which there are some 5 hectares in the Irancy appellation, is said to have been brought here by the Roman. It is a vigorous variety which produces largish bunches of black grapes. On its own it makes a deep colored wine with red-fruit aromas and fairly rustic tannins.

Production surface area
1 hectare (ha) = 2.4 acres
164.18 ha Food
Irancy can be either solid or lacy (pretty much depending on the presence or absence of the Cesar grape), so matching them with food is a case-by-case decision.  More tannic young Irancy would match grilled, even barbecued meats.  While the more delicate versions are excellent with charcuterie: pâtés, terrines and saucisson. The cheese board could include almost any of the regional cheeses: Coulommiers, Brie de Meaux, Chaource, Langres, Époisses, Soumaintrain.

Shop our wines from this region